Tag Archives: Health

Fake Autism Treatments Are Both Dangerous And Insulting

Despite being thoroughly scientifically debunked, there continue to be be substantial numbers of parents who hold peculiar beliefs related to a) the causes of, and b) cures for their children’s autism.

In a piece for Vox’s First Person essay section Sarah explained why this sort of thinking is both dangerous and insulting.

To read the piece go here.

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Why 36 Is A Dreaded Number For Autistics

When Sarah turned 36 it was less a celebration than an acknowledgment of a morbid milestone. That’s because according to the American Journal of Public Health 36 is the average life expectancy for autistic people.

Sarah wrote about this for Vox.

To read the story go here.

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Samaritan News 15 Pack: Ryan Reynolds, NHL, Metallica, More

Ryan Reynolds vs. Hugh Jackman

Here’s a collection of 15 posts I contributed to the charitably-minded entertainment site Samaritanmag:

Vancouver Act Galactic Hobos Donating Proceeds From Two New Singles To Parkinson’s Research

Canadian Music Industry Rallies To Support Veteran Music Journalist Lenny Stoute

Girl Gang Goodies, Tonic Blooms Team Up To Support Sistering Toronto

Stephen Marley Tour To Raise Money For Ghetto Youths Foundation

WATCH: Feud Between Ryan Reynolds And Hugh Jackman Shows How Coffee Company Is Helping People

Grammy Awards Dolly Parton Tribute, Compilation Album, Memorabilia Auction To Benefit MusiCares Charity

Tim Hortons Co-Founder Ron Joyce Leaves A Lasting Charitable Legacy

NFL To Give NFL Award Money To Colin Kaepernick Initiative

Terra Lightfoot, Lindi Ortega And Begonia Tour To Benefit Four Charities

Bell Let’s Talk: What Bell Media Does For Mental Health All Year Round

Winter Sports Camp For Veterans With Disabilities Kicks Off In California

Snowboarder Mark McMorris Directs Proceeds of His Kiehl’s Cream to Kids Sports Foundation

Arcade Fire, Arkells, Dan Mangan, Peaches Among Many Canadian Musicians Supporting Wet’suwet’en Land Defenders

NHL All-Star Game Jerseys Will Be Made Of Repurposed Marine Plastics

Metallica To Release Acoustic Live Double Album On Vinyl For Charity

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Filed under Culture, Environment, Health, Music, Politics, Shameless Promotion

13 Culture And Learning Stories From Asian World Of Martial Arts

Jiu-jitsu

Asian World Of Martial Arts continues to regularly publish a combination of learning and pop culture-related stories by Sarah to help readers understand their world. Here’s a batch:

The Benefits of Boxing For Kids

The Diverse Martial Arts Influences of Netflix’s Wu Assassins

Can You Use MMA Headgear For Taekwondo?

Pro Wrestling Meets Kung Fu In Oriental Wrestling Entertainment

The Basics of Bareknuckle Boxing

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu vs Japanese Jujutsu

What Is Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings Star Simu Liu’s Martial Arts Background?

The Tae Kwon Do Fighter Behind The Bottle Cap Challenge

The Best Martial Arts For Self-Defense For Women

The New Mortal Kombat Movie Is On A Talent Search For Martial Artists

A Guide To Buying The Right Boxing Shoes

Teen Kickboxing Star Receives Ringing Endorsement From Her Idol, Jackie Chan

Choose The Boxing Style To Match Your Body Type

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Imagining A Fuller Spectrum Of Autism On TV

Julia, the autistic Muppet.

Julia, the autistic Muppet.

Autism is currently enjoying an unprecedented wave of popularity in film and television. From educational programming to tent-pole blockbusters, new stories have been breaking boundaries, warming hearts, and raising awareness around the neurodevelopmental condition, which is currently diagnosed in one in 68 children. Once relegated to glorified props in prestige Oscar-bait like Rain Man, autistic characters can now be gun-brandishing action heroes, charmingly horny teenagers, and progress-making muppets.

Still, while fictional autistics are being enthusiastically embraced by non-autistic artists and viewers alike, their reception among real-life autistic people like me has been far more ambivalent. Atypical and The Good Doctor both offer portrayals of brilliant young men on the spectrum, and both shows have their supporters among autistic critics and fans. I’m genuinely excited about Sesame Street‘s Julia, a four-year-old autistic muppet, and the positive influence that her visibility will have on the next generation. In general, though, these explicitly identified characters rarely become as popular as the other characters that we’ve claimed for ourselves.

Faced with a climate where most mainstream portrayals of autism are crafted almost entirely by non-autistic people—often seemingly for a non-autistic audience—autistic people have been forced to get creative in our search for meaningful representation. Some, like autistic authors Rachael Lucas, Helen Hoang, and Corinne Duyvis have successfully created their own characters and stories in books like The State of Grace, On the Edge of Gone, and the forthcoming The Kiss Quotient. Many more have taken to blogs and social media to offer armchair diagnoses about already existing characters, discussing why we think they might be one of us. These readings are called “autistic headcanons”—the process of specifically adding autism to our personal understanding of a character, all in the context of the story.

As an autistic writer who spends a lot of time online, I find the act of forming and discussing autistic headcanons to be a fascinating look into the way that autistic people can use pop culture to better understand ourselves and the world around us. What I find most interesting, though, is how little overlap there is between the characters that are ostensibly created in our image by others, and the characters that we choose for ourselves.

An enthusiasm for headcanons is not, as I’m sure many non-autistic people might suspect, a desire to glamorize our condition, nor a symptom of our deficient empathy or theory of mind. Whenever there’s a chasm between conventional assumptions about autism and the beliefs of self-advocates, there’s a tendency for a certain segment of the neurotypical population to blame the discrepancy on autism itself. But that argument is often easily refuted by the content of the autistic headcanon discussions themselves. Autistic people aren’t gravitating toward certain characters simply because we are looking for a very specific recreation of our own experience on the spectrum. We understand that people experience the world differently, and that each autistic individual is unique—and it’s that range of experience that we’re longing to see better represented on screen.

As prevalent as autism has become in film and TV lately, it still tends to look, sound, and behave a certain way. With the exception of Sonya Cross (Diane Kruger) in The Bridge and Wendy (Dakota Fanning) in the recently released Please Stand By, these characters are almost invariably young men. With the exception of Billy (R.J. Cyler), the Blue Ranger from 2017’s Power Rangers, they’re almost exclusively white. Heterosexuality, cis-genderhood, and savantism are all disproportionately represented. Most of these characters appear to be constructed from the same checklist of common symptoms: no eye contact, a flat-affect voice, and generically awkward body language.

Cherry-pick a few posts on blogs or Tumblr accounts like “Autistic Headcanons” and “Your Faves Are Autistic,” though, and you’ll soon glimpse a much broader spectrum of identities, personalities, and experiences. Claiming Holtzmann — Kate McKinnon’s character in Ghostbusters, for example — allowed autistic fans to discuss everything from her sensory-friendly wardrobe choices to her echolalia-like speech patterns to her queerness. Analyzing the physicality of characters as diverse as Ren McCormack from the original Footloose, South Park‘s Kyle, and Disney’s Snow White brings a much broader view to the kinds of repetitive movements that autistic people employ to stim. Star Trek: Discovery‘s Michael Burnham, a human with Vulcan training, has recently struck a chord with autistic people who have emotions, but sometimes struggle to process or express them. Headcanon after headcanon, autistic people are demanding—and envisioning—more from an industry that’s increasingly profiting from our lives.

In a 2015 post titled “A Headcanon Named Autism: In Defense of Finding Our Own Representation,” the anonymous blogger Feminist Aspie wrote:

I want to see a world where books and TV shows and films depict autistic people of color, LGBTQIA+ autistic people, autistic women, autistic people with other disabilities, autistic people who can pass for neurotypical and who can’t, autistic people who are verbal, non-verbal, partially verbal, autistic people with all kinds of special interests, autistic people who use special interests in their work and those who don’t, autistic people who are hypersensitive and hyposensitive and sensory-seeking, autistic people of all ages and all occupations, autistic heroes, autistic villains, autistic geeks and autistic sports captains and everything in between, with good qualities and flaws that are related to autism and those that aren’t related to autism at all—realistic, multi-dimensional autistic characters that don’t feel hollow or like the butt of a joke. And until that’s achieved, autistic media consumers everywhere will keep working our headcanon magic.

Whether or not pop culture can outgrow the need for autistic headcanons is largely dependent on what non-autistic people — the other 67 in 68 — genuinely think about us. If we are, as I’ve argued before, little more than a challenge or accessory for neurotypical artists and a prop for neurotypical audiences, then their autistic counterparts must continue to forge our own path. If the current wave of autism entertainment is just the start of a greater public hunger for more and better autism representation, then the rest of the world will have to start making more space for a wider range of autistic people on both sides of the screen. If we can expand the conversation and the vision for autistic characters when armed with little more than existing properties and Internet access, imagine what we could do with our own characters and the means with which to share them.

This story was originally published February 22, 2018 via Pacific Standard

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Filed under Films, Health, Politics, Television

Samaritan News 15 Pack: Stormzy, Alice Cooper, More

Stormzy

I continue to contribute to the charitably-minded entertainment site Samaritanmag.

Here are some pieces I contributed awhile back:

WATCH: New Gillette Ad Confronts Toxic Masculinity, Challenges Men To Do Better

Blue Jays Annual Toronto Winter Fest Supports Jays Care Foundation

Barenaked Ladies, Scott Helman, Monster Truck, USS Among Acts Honouring Walk Off The Earth’s Mike Taylor At Free Show

Italian Band Mardi Gras Records “One Guitar” To Support Light Of Day Foundation

Adele, Stormzy, Marcus Mumford Part Of New Grenfell Tower Fire Awareness Video

Holt Renfrew Holiday Gund Bear Proceeds To Support WWF Canada

Crowdfunding Campaign Launched For Tom Cochrane Tour Manager Gerry Lee After Stroke

Late Mac Miller Single To Help Fund Underserved Communities

Alice Cooper’s Christmas Pudding Stirs in Hollywood Vampires, Gretchen Wilson, Sebastian Bach, Members of Blue Oyster Cult and More

Global Citizen EP1 Featuring Pharrell Williams, Stormzy, David Guetta, More Being Used To Fight Poverty

“The Talk” Raises $77,000 For UforChange Regent Park Art Charity

Roy Clark Family’s Seeking Donations For St. Jude Children’s Hospital

Bruce Springsteen-Connected Light Of Day Foundation Hosting 28 Events In Europe, New York, New Jersey For Parkinson’s Research

Release Of Rare Sufjan Stevens Song “Lonely Man of Winter” To Benefit Non-Profit Arts Venue

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Filed under Environment, Health, Music, Politics, Shameless Promotion

16 Learning Stories From Asian World Of Martial Arts

Asian World Of Martial Arts continues to regularly publish learning stories to help readers understand their world.

Here are some of Sarah’s recent contributions:

The Best Martial Arts To Get In Shape For Summer

Why Martial Arts Are A Good Summer Activity For Kids

How To Wrap Your Hands For Boxing

The Connection Between Star Wars and Martial Arts

Group Kickboxing Classes vs Personal Training

Which Celebrities Prefer Boxing as a Workout

Benefits of Cardio Kickboxing

5 New Women’s Boxing Fitness Accessories For Spring

Pencak Silat: Real vs Fake

What Krav Maga Looks Like Today

5 Trending Images of Systema on Pinterest

Manny Pacquiao Calls Out Floyd Mayweather After Winning His Latest Fight

The Fascination with Russian Sambo

Self-Defense Skills Help Thwart Two Real Life Criminal Attacks

Pencak Silat: Full Contact Martial Arts

Krav Maga: The Deadliest Martial Arts

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Filed under Health, Jock Stuff, Shameless Promotion