GWAR — The Blood Of Gods (Album Review)

GWAR - The Blood Of Gods

GWAR – The Blood Of Gods

The last thing I expected to find when I listened to a new GWAR album in 2017 was… humanity. And yet, here we are. In an age where Insane Clown Posse have become civil rights activists, where Jimmy Kimmel, a person’s whose old show used to do a side-business selling Girls on Trampolines DVDs, is now our nightly voice of the resistance, and where Eminem has become a woke protest singer, GWAR’s enlightenment (of a sort) doesn’t feel so weird.

To be fair, you still have to squint a fair amount to find said humanity from these alien invader/heavy metal cartoon warriors. After all, there’s still lots of in-the-pocket GWAR to be found on The Blood Of Gods. “I’ll Be Your Monster” is like a flip on Alice Cooper shock rock with an actual hint of menace, “Viking Death Machine” is a free wheel burnin’ highway anthem, and the band’s cover of AC/DC’s “If You Want Blood (You Got It)” is so obvious it’s stunning they hadn’t thought to do it before now.

But then there’s the anti-overpopulation screed “Swarm,” the let’s-kill-the-president shanty “El Presidente” and the cathartically universal “Fuck This Place.” If sometimes feeling like our need to conquer and explore has irreparably messed up the planet, or worrying that the world is teetering on the brink of destruction because of a mentally damaged world leader aren’t absolutely human concerns then I don’t know what are. Throw in “Phantom Limb,” a fitting tribute to deceased former band leader Oderus Urungus, and these songs are a fair argument for a surprisingly tender GWAR. At least in their way.

Either that, or the world is going to such shit that I’ve started to look to GWAR for morality tales. In which case, fuck this place.

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Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2’s Lessons In Womanhood

Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, according to Sarah, has some merits that may not be obvious on the surface of the camp horror film.

That’s why she wrote “Nothing Has Prepared Me For The Reality of Womanhood Better Than ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2′” for Electric Literature.

To read the whole essay click here.

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Black Panther Is Going To Be Fighty Good

Black Panther

Black Panther

At this point it’s pretty obvious the Black Panther movie is going to be amazing.

It’s also probably going to have great fight sequences.

Sarah explained why in a piece for Asian World Of Martial Arts.

To read it click here.

 

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The Pursuit Of Positive Video Games

Games For Change participants

Games For Change participants

Games For Change is an organization dedicated to using video games to make positive social change in the world through various initiatives.

I spoke to the organization’s president Susan Pollack about what they’re trying to achieve and how Lady Gaga figures into all of it in a piece for Samaritanmag.

To read the story click here.

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Sarah In ‘The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose’

Broadview Anthology

Broadview Anthology

Sarah has a contribution in The Broadview Anthology of Expository Prose – Third Canadian Edition.

It’s kind of a big deal considering the collection also has pieces from Margaret Atwood, Justin Trudeau, Zadie Smith and many more.

To find out more about the book go here.

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7 Things Autistic People Want You To Know

This past April the folks at Health.com commissioned Sarah to write “7 Things Autistic People Want You To Know.”

Among these things? Your world is exhausting.

To read the full story head to the Health site by going here.

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Matt Good Tried To Create His Own Broken Social Scene

Matthew Good

Matthew Good

Matthew Good, Can-rock’s number one provocateur, says he attempted to create his own Vancouver version of Broken Social Scene, Toronto’s critically-lauded space jam indie rock outfit.

“I’ve tried to. I’ve tried to,” says Good, explaining how the BSS-imitation was one of many artistic ventures he’s embarked on since the Matthew Good Band officially dissolved in 2001. “I’ve tried to form tons of different side-projects. But you get involved with people and — a lot of the people I’ve been involved with — they just, it just turns into a power struggle. And all I ever want to do in those bands is just play rhythm guitar. I don’t even want to sing.”

As part of an interview for the cover story of Chart Magazine’s upcoming September 2004 issue — his first interview with the mag since ’01 — Good discussed BSS, as well as a wide range of topics including the final days of MGB, his new album (White Light Rock & Roll Review), his humanitarian efforts and related fights with right-wing organizations, his affection for country music, and some of the artistic ventures he hopes to tackle in the future.

Good’s Social Scene attempt came after listening to BSS’s You Forgot It In People album, one of his recent favourites.

“The last Broken Social Scene record I listened to quite a bit and I thought was really interesting,” he says. “A lot of the ideas on it were really, really good.”

Don’t think Good’s motives were all pure, though. Seeing how Good has been the rock ‘n’ roll point- person/figurehead for the last 10 years as a band leader and solo artist, being part of a jam-out gang would have given him some time to, in Don Cherryspeak, have a few “pops.”

“My idea of paradise is going on tour once in my life where I don’t have to go to bed early because I have to sing the next day,” he says. “I can just have a beer and talk to people and play guitar. Paradise.

“The collective idea is really interesting. It would probably be more interesting to see how long it would last really. ‘Cuz it can get a little convoluted… And it does have that kinda really cool factor to it.”

This news piece was originally published August 13, 2004 via Chart Communications.

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