Tag Archives: Film

Titanic Is Mine, Not James Cameron’s

Titanic

Titanic

One of Sarah’s deepest and most enduring interests is the Titanic.

Not the movie, the actual doomed ocean liner.

This vessel/subject of much imaginative speculation is also an interest for filmmaker James Cameron and Sarah is having none of it.

She explained why in a personal essay for Electric Lit.

To read the full thing go here.

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Filed under Films, Recollections, Shameless Promotion, Television, Travel

What About That New Power Rangers Trailer?

Power Rangers

Power Rangers

Iconic kids martial arts television series Power Rangers is getting a big film reboot.

Sarah tried to unlock some of the clues to what the new film will be like when the newest trailer for the film was released.

She wrote about this for Asian World Of Martial Arts.

To read it click here.

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Battle Of The Scores At TIFF Next Wave

home-nextwave2013

At the risk of coming across as even older and more crotchety than I am, back in my day, teenage film lovers had to skulk over to their local Blockbuster and rent the location’s measly collection of three Fellini tapes over and over again to get their fix. So I can’t help but feel a little envious of the kids these days, with their streaming options and their digital cameras and their Vines.

I’m especially jealous of their ability to enjoy and participate in TIFF Next Wave, a film festival by and for teens between the ages of 14 and 18. Now in its second year, TIFF Next Wave features screenings of teen-oriented flicks, Q&As with stars and directors, and interactive workshops and challenges for budding filmmakers. The festival isn’t just a breeding and training ground for the next generation of film lovers, Toronto International Film Festival patrons and Cronenbergs, though. It’s also doing its part to foster the next batch of Arcade Fires and Weeknds thanks to an event called Battle of the Scores.

Every year, six high school acts from a wide range of genres are chosen from an open call to participate in the Battle. They’re given three weeks to compose a score for an original silent film (also made by some preternaturally talented whippersnapper, like this year’s director, 18 year old Ben Roberts). And then, as part of Next Wave’s opening night festivities, they’re thrown on stage underneath one of the big screens at the TIFF Bell Lightbox to perform a live version of their score in front of an audience of friends, peers, and an expert panel of judges from the music and film industries. The winners of the competition are given a prime slot on the soundtrack for an upcoming film.

After attending the 2013 edition of the TIFF Next Wave Battle of the Bands and talking to all of the competitors this past February, I found myself just as envious of their drive and focus as I was of the opportunities that festival and the battle were offering them. None of the four bands and two solo acts who performed their original scores as part of the event were doing it as a lark. All of them were serious about their music and saw the competition as a great way to gain experience and exposure.

Some of them, like the one man loop and string machine Ari Van de Ven, signed up because they want to pursue a career in scoring for films. Moody acoustic foursome  Safe As Houses are already old hands at the art form, having recently recorded the soundtrack for a friend’s silent horror film. Almost all of the musicians involved are working toward careers in the arts, and many of them will be off to study music in the next year or two. A couple of members of Garrison Creek are also looking at film school.  The sleek and stylish rockers in Post would love to make a career of their band (“If it could take us that far, that would be a dream come true for us,” they told me.) Even electronic artist New World Mayor, who is going to Waterloo for mathematics next year, hopes to keep up his art in some way.

Second time contestants Lucas Bozzo and Elena Hudgins-Lyle, who brought their ethereal art rock unit Talkback Radio along with them this time around, did briefly interrupt their discussion about their vision for the band’s future to rhapsodize about last year’s after party and its free poutine. But really, an appreciation of free food is a pretty important skill to cultivate if you’re going to pursue if you’re looking at a career in the Canadian arts and entertainment world.

All six acts were just as proficient and professional on stage as they were off, which made for some agonizing deliberation among jury members. In the end, though, Post came one step closer to their own dream come true when they were declared the winners of the Battle of the Scores and awarded a spot on the soundtrack for the next project by Canadian zombie flick Dead Before Dawn 3D’s directing and writing team, April Mullen and Tim Doiron.

After the big reveal, the whole crowd was led down to the bowels of the Lightbox for a genuine ’80s-themed garage party, where everyone could indulge in free food, celebrate the opening of the Next Wave Festival, and bask in their youthful talent, potential and go-getterness. Everyone except the bitter girl in front of, that is, who preferred to mutter that she was glad the whole thing was over and made a “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out” reference.

It was reassuring in a way. Kids these days might have cool festivals and incredible chances to hone their craft that people my age could only have dreamed of. But at least they still have to deal with the same existential angst and fondness for Morrissey that we did.

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Filed under Concerts, Films, Music

May The Fourth Be With You

Star Wars fans

Star Wars fans

For those of you not aware of the neo maxi zoom dweebie sub-culture that is super-duper Star Wars fans, yesterday was May 4, so those sci-fi dorkus malorkuses who understand wordplay have turned May the 4th into “May the Force…” as in, “… be with you.” As in, the Star Wars line.

So, in honour of yesterday being international Star Wars day I found a few youtube Star Wars music clips that were entertaining.

Click here to look at the article.

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Filed under Culture, Films, Music, Shameless Promotion

Hanson Discuss The Merits Of Star Wars And Star Trek

You can take the girl out of the Star Trek conventions, but you can’t take the Trekkie out of the girl. There’s really no other reason that Sarah started talking to Hanson about Star Trek and Star Wars when they were in town to promote their new album, Shout It Out.

In honour of May The Fourth, she shared their conversation with AOL Music Blog. You can check it out here.

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Being Wary Of Ginger Baker Has Certain Life Lessons

Ginger Baker

Ginger Baker

Beware Of Mr. Baker is nominally documentary about madman drumming legend Ginger Baker, whose musical history includes working with Cream, Blind Faith and Fela Kuti, amongst others. But it’s just as much a cautionary tale about what happens when you do what you want and don’t really give a shit about anything or anyone else.

Right from scene one — in which Baker, now an angry old curmudgeon withering his days away in South Africa, attacks director Jay Bulger — the drummer’s reputation as a difficult person is on display.

Sure, enough, as Bulger takes the viewer through a Baker 101 history lesson — his toxic relationships with Cream bassist Jack Bruce and guitarist Eric Clapton, his drummer battles versus other legendary beaters, his flameouts with ex-wives and his world traveling misadventures — complete with often compelling archival footage, it becomes absolutely clear Baker’s a jerk and a horrible person.

But he’s also a bold, unique and uncompromising one.

The only things that Baker actually cares about are his drumming, his desire to be taken seriously by respected jazz musicians, and the stable of polo horses he keeps. Every other aspect of Baker’s journey through life he treats with something between indifference and bridge-burning malevolence.

For anyone who has seen Lemmy, the documentary on Motorhead‘s Lemmy Kilmister, there are some interesting parallels between the moled singer and Baker. Both have untraditional relationships with sons who’ve clearly also gone into music to forge some connections with their fathers, both lead relatively solitary, arguably sad lives, yet both remain unrepentantly committed to what they are. They’ve lived their lives as musical outlaws, doing what they want, how they want to do it, and damn the consequences, they’ll never change.

And that’s the thing. Decades from now few people will remember Ginger Baker the horrible human, but those Cream records, his virtual invention of the drum solo, his travels to Africa on musical walkabouts — those are the things he’ll likely be remembered for. And if Baker ruffled a few feathers to achieve it all, he’d probably say it was worth it. And then punch you.

Beware Of Mr. Baker trailer

Cream “I Feel Free”

Fela Kuti in performance, filmed by Ginger Baker

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Sigur Ros Spy Cam Movie Is Making Film Nerds Nutty

Sigur Ros

Sigur Ros

There’s a new Sigur Ros concert film called INNI that’s been making all the hipster film nerds crazy with its grainy black-and-white footage, its intimate up-nose camera shots and other goodness.

Sarah spoke to director Vincent Morriset about the film for Spinner Canada. You can read about it by clicking here.

 

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